What Do Pilates Teachers Mean When They Say “Stretching While Strengthening”?

“Notice here how you’re stretching while strengthening” is a phrase that many Pilates instructors use but many students are often shy to ask what this means. What Pilates instructors mean is that rather than simply pulling a muscle longer, or making use of static leverage to stretch, we can utilise our muscles in order to increase range of motion and encourage balanced muscle development.

It’s incredibly important to remember that if we merely stretch a muscle, all that you get is a longer muscle. And even then, it’s often only temporary. If the muscle is pulled, it could end up less flexible. Instead, if we strengthen and stretch, we have:

  • Less painful joints,
  • Smoother muscle tone,
  • Increased strength, and
  • More range of motion.

What Is The Practical Application Of Pilates?

Improper posture can have catastrophic effects on your body, particularly when the muscle strain is extended and not addressed. Bad posture can affect ligaments tendons as well as the muscles in your back and shoulders. In some cases, this can result in discomfort due to compensatory as well as improper movement patterns and ultimately injury.

Pilates tackles this issue, which is often seen in people who work lengthy hours sitting behind a computer or those who have developed scoliosis or spinal degenerative disease over the years. By strengthening your core as well as back muscles, Pilates allows you to align your spine and shoulders properly in order to achieve an ideal posture as well as alleviate some of the stress it places on your spine.

Pilates Teaches Proper Rehabilitative Techniques

Many times, physical therapy entails having patients do exercises that they are not prepared to do, either because these are too painful or because they do not know how to execute them correctly.

Pilates fights this issue by making it a priority to teach how essential muscle alignment as well as proper body positioning are when it comes to doing exercises for rehabilitative purposes. Not understanding how to align the body in order to achieve maximum results can not only slow down the healing process but can also lead to further injury.

A Pilates class will also provide you with the mental tools that you need to become cognisant of your posture and your movements, teaching you how to recognise properly when your spine is not aligned. People who suffer from scoliosis or spinal diseases can really benefit from this sort of mental awareness.

Pilates Helps In Rehab After Knee Surgery

One of the most important advantages of Pilates is its improvement of joint mobility. This is owing to the fact that the muscles surrounding these joints are being strengthened as well as elongated with every class, which increases your range of motion in a safe manner.

Increased joint mobility lessens how stiff your joints feel. When Pilates is performed regularly and for extended periods of time, it can also help lower the risk of arthritis. In addition, this can be a great treatment or alternative for those who have undergone hip or knee-replacement surgery, allowing them to regain full control in the post surgically

Although Pilates is often linked with dancers, athletes, and younger people who are generally interested in improving their physical strength as well as flexibility, a basic version of some Pilates exercises is also being utilised in order to lower the risk of hospital-related deconditioning in older adults. A Canadian study of hospitalised patients over the age of 70 found that those who were provided with a set of Pilates exercises that could be done in bed recovered more rapidly as opposed to a control group given a set of passive range-of-motion exercises.

Contact Trifocus Fitness Academy

As you can see, Pilates’ strengthening while stretching principle has superb benefits in rehab, amongst many other things. If you want to know how to leverage these benefits for others then you need to do our Pilates Instructor Course. For more information, please follow this link.

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